I’m a victim of EFCC, DSS rivalry – Kingsley Kuku opens up

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I’m a victim of EFCC, DSS rivalry - Kingsley Kuku opens up

Kingsley Kuku, former special adviser on Niger Delta to former President Goodluck Jonathan, says he is a victim of the rivalry between the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) and the Department of State Services (DSS).

Kuku said this in a statement he issued on Thursday.

The EFCC had several times in 2015 invited Kuku, who is in the US, for questioning on alleged financial fraud, but he did not honour the invitations.

The anti-graft agency had since not taken any further action on the matter owing to a court order restraining it from doing so.

However, the DSS allegedly accused the EFCC of shielding the former presidential aide, whom the agency wanted for interrogation.

The secret police alleged that Kuku was behind some of the militant activities in the Niger Delta.

But he denied the claim, saying the agency was desperate to arrest to him so as to give him the “Dasuki treatment”.

Sambo Dasuki, former national security adviser (NSA), has been in the custody of the DSS since 2015 despite several court orders for his release.

Below is the statement:

“Time cannot run against the state in arresting or prosecuting the applicant if truly he is culpable of the alleged offence. The respondents have nothing to lose if status quo is maintained. Therefore, all action concerning arrest, detention and prosecution of the applicant should hold on for now, till final determination of the appeal on the matter.”
 – Justice Okon Abang

For four years, beginning from January 2011, I served as Special Adviser on Niger Delta under the administration of former President Goodluck Jonathan. During this period, I also doubled as chairman of the Presidential Amnesty Programme (PAP).

This period accorded me the privilege of serving Nigeria at another level different from my previous experience as a lawmaker in the Ondo State House of Assembly between 2003 and 2007.

In July 2015, I travelled to the United States of America for a pre-scheduled medical examination and eventually had to undergo an excruciating surgery on my knee. I was already in hospital when news got to me that I had been invited by the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) over allegations bordering supposedly on misapplication of funds during my tenure as chairman of the Presidential Amnesty Programme.

In that my medical condition, I could not honour the EFCC invitation. My counsel had to write to the commission on my behalf formally informing it of my absence from the country and that I will honour the invitation when I complete my medical procedure.

The EFCC, however, responded with threats and harassment, which began with the freezing of the bank account of the Keketobou Foundation, an educational and charity non-governmental organisation I set up in honour of my mother.

The commission followed this up with the arrest and detention of some former staff of the Amnesty Office after which two of them were eventually arraigned when they refused to make a statement implicating me. The matter is pending at the Federal Capital Territory High Court in Abuja.

I was then left with no other option than to approach the courts seeking the protection and enforcement of my fundamental human rights.

On April 5, 2016, while ruling on my fundamental right enforcement suit, Justice Okon Abang sitting at the Federal High Court, Lagos, restrained the EFCC, Department of State Services (DSS), Independent Corrupt Practices Commission (ICPC), Immigration, Customs, Nigerian Security and Civil Defence Corps as well as the Police and other security and investigative agencies from arresting, detaining or prosecuting me pending the determination of an appeal on an earlier ruling of the court on February 17, 2016.

While ordering all parties in the suit to maintain the status quo pending the determination of my appeal on the matter, Justice Abang ruled: “Time cannot run against the State in arresting or prosecuting the applicant if truly he is culpable of the alleged offence. The respondents have nothing to lose if status quo is maintained. Therefore, all action concerning arrest, detention and prosecution of the applicant should hold on for now, till final determination of the appeal on the matter.”

Earlier in February 2016, Justice Valentine Ashi of the Federal Capital Territory High Court had given a similar restraining order on all the earlier mentioned security and investigative agencies.

These valid and potent order of the courts subsist as the appeal before the Appeal Court, Lagos Division has not been determined. Continue reading from source.

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